Tag Archives: EDSA Revolution

The spirit of EDSA lives on

Its cathartic power continues to provide relief and refreshes hope. The over arching and encompassing spirit cannot and will never be domesticated. Its mystery remains unspoiled, not completely unfolded.

These three insights summarized my series of reflections on EDSA and Lent during the Silver Anniversary of People Power Revolution in 2011. I was still  struggling with my health condition, at that time, making me vulnerable to depression. A pastor friend  had encouraged me to blog as part of my healing process. Thereafter, I experienced the miracle of blogging.

I have decided to repost these insights as my contribution to the 28th Anniversary of  EDSA Revolution today with the theme “Kapit-Bisig Tungo sa Pagbangon.” For  the historic event was instrumental in changing  my life’s direction. 

The Cathartic power of EDSA

Image credit: The Philippine Star Editorial Cartoon 2/25/2013

Nobody will ever deny that EDSA Revolution had provided relief to wounded and bruised nation, captive for decades by an abusive rule. Although debates over extent of healing still looms, it does not diminish the magical power of the historic event. I continue to experience this power while recalling my half a decade involvement in people’s struggle in the local context as part of the national call. Inevitably, haunting past events involving comrades, friends and the basic masses characterized the slow and painful process undertaken until that victorious day.

The feeling of gratitude to God for my survival and the thoughts of my contribution in shaping the history has been cathartic. Although my involvement pales in comparison to the intensity and period suffered by nameless and countless faces. The cathartic power of EDSA also refreshes my hope to attain full recovery from lingering illness. Chronic heart ailment, compounded by nerve disorder, has constrained my active life of service for three years now. The delay of complete healing makes me vulnerable to discouragement and depression. But recalling EDSA Revolution gives me new drive to conquer, if I will not give in to despair.

EDSA’s over arching and encompassing spirit

Like Lent, nobody can domesticate the EDSA Revolution. Even the so called EDSA heroes cannot claim exclusive right to the historical and mystical event in the Philippines. For the spirit of EDSA is inclusive. It is above all and encircles all.

What happened in EDSA 27 years ago reflects the truism of systems theory. The key concepts of the systems theory are wholeness, relationship, and homeostasis. The beauty of systems theory is represented by the rainbow. While there are only three primary colors (red, yellow, blue) there is a multiplication of colors when these link, interact, and overlap. Try to separate one from the other, and the beauty of rainbow is gone.

Image credit: cbclawmatters.blogspot.com

So with EDSA. It is a culmination of respective struggles participated in by the basic masses who since time immemorial always take the lead as they are ones affected. Then comes various sectors of diverse orientation, status, political and ideological leanings, colors and shapes. Youth, professionals, church people, businessmen and women, government officials, military and others. All have contributed their share in shaping the Philippine history. Try to isolate one, and the beauty of the event is gone.

Such inclusive spirit should have been the focus in celebrating EDSA and in sustaining its gains and the struggle for change. Most often, movement for change and development in any field of endeavor is often hampered by bigotry and exclusivism. Essential issues are sidetracked or left behind to give way to the struggle for supremacy misled by an illusion that one has the sole reservoir of truth and best approach in any given situation. It is only when one realizes the need to link with each other that the beauty of unity in diversity is seen like that of the rainbow.

The unspoiled mystery of EDSA

Twenty eight years after, the mystery of EDSA has not been fully unfolded. Analysts from various socio-political persuasions attempted to explain the event. Some had to come up with new concepts as EDSA Revolution departed from any of the standard categories. While new testimonies from living participants came out every year, they just shed light to understand the pattern of events and contributing factors. But the mystery still remains.

EDSA bloodless Revolution defied logic. For how can you explain this phenomenon: “When guns and tanks of a dictator melted before the flowers held out by priests and nuns, by millionaires’ sons and squatters’ daughters, by ordinary men and women and by young and old alike; when… a new day was ushered in by ordinary Filipino common tao who rose to heroic heights that won the admiration of the whole world…” The quoted description was that of Jorge Lorredo, Jr. in his article “Four Days that changed History” published in Bulletin Today exactly 28 years ago, as cited by Douglas J. Elwood in his book, Philippine Revolution.

The hand of God was there…” was the explanation of the late Dr. Quintin Doromal, former PCCG commissioner & president of Siliman University. Quoted by his friend Douglas Elwood in the book, Doromal, an Ilonggo leader, was a witness to the event, having joined his old friend Fidel Ramos at Camp Crame and stayed there with him throughout those critical anxious hours.

Indeed, God acts through people, as surely as he speaks through people, and that he uses the sometimes complex interconnection of human forces to serve his larger purposes.

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2013 in review: When blogging becomes a ministry

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,100 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

The spirit of EDSA lives on

Its cathartic power continues to provide relief and refreshes hope. The over arching and encompassing spirit cannot and will never be domesticated. Its mystery remains unspoiled, not completely unfolded.

These three insights summarized my series of reflections on EDSA and Lent during  the Silver Anniversary of People Power Revolution in 2011. I have decided  to repost these insights for their relevance to the 27th Anniversary of EDSA Revolution with the theme “Pilipinas Natin: Abot -tanaw Na.”

The Cathartic power of EDSA

The Philippine Star Editorial Cartoon 2/25/2013

The Philippine Star Editorial Cartoon 2/25/2013

Nobody will ever deny that EDSA Revolution had provided relief to wounded and bruised nation, captive for decades by an abusive rule. Although debates over extent of healing still looms, it does not diminish the magical power of the historic event. I continue to experience this power while recalling my half a decade involvement in people’s struggle in the local context as part of the national call. Inevitably, haunting past events involving comrades, friends and the basic masses characterized the slow and painful process undertaken until that victorious day.

The feeling of gratitude to God for my survival and the thoughts of my contribution in shaping the history has been cathartic. Although my involvement pales in comparison to the intensity and period suffered by nameless and countless faces. The cathartic power of EDSA also refreshes my hope to attain full recovery from lingering illness. Chronic heart ailment, compounded by nerve disorder, has constrained my active life of service for three years now. The delay of complete healing makes me vulnerable to discouragement and depression. But recalling EDSA Revolution gives me new drive to conquer, if I will not give in to despair.

EDSA’s  over arching and encompassing spirit

Like Lent, nobody can domesticate the EDSA Revolution. Even the so called EDSA heroes cannot claim exclusive right to the historical and mystical event in the Philippines. For the spirit of EDSA is inclusive. It is above all and encircles all.

What happened in EDSA 27 years ago reflects the truism of systems theory. The key concepts of the systems theory are wholeness, relationship, and homeostasis. The beauty of systems theory is represented by the rainbow. While there are only three primary colors (red, yellow, blue) there is a multiplication of colors when these link, interact, and overlap. Try to separate one from the other, and the beauty of rainbow is gone.

edsa shift

cbclawmatters.blogspot.com

So with EDSA. It is a culmination of respective struggles participated in by the basic masses who since time immemorial always take the lead as they are ones affected. Then comes various sectors of diverse orientation, status, political and ideological leanings, colors and shapes. Youth, professionals, church people, businessmen and women, government officials, military and others. All have contributed their share in shaping the Philippine history. Try to isolate one, and the beauty of the event is gone.

Such inclusive spirit should have been the focus in celebrating EDSA and in sustaining its gains and the struggle for change. Most often, movement for change and development in any field of endeavor is often hampered by bigotry and exclusivism. Essential issues are sidetracked or left behind to give way to the struggle for supremacy misled by an illusion that one has the sole reservoir of truth and best approach in any given situation. It is only when one realizes the need to link with each other that the beauty of unity in diversity is seen like that of the rainbow.

The unspoiled mystery of EDSA

Twenty seven years after, the mystery of EDSA has not been fully unfolded. Analysts from various socio-political persuasions attempted to explain the event. Some had to come up with new concepts as EDSA Revolution departed from any of the standard categories. While new testimonies from living participants came out every year, they just shed light to understand the pattern of events and contributing factors. But the mystery still remains.

EDSA bloodless Revolution defied logic. For how can you explain this phenomenon: “When guns and tanks of a dictator melted before the flowers held out by priests and nuns, by millionaires’ sons and squatters’ daughters, by ordinary men and women and by young and old alike; when… a new day was ushered in by ordinary Filipino common tao who rose to heroic heights that won the admiration of the whole world…” The quoted description was that of Jorge Lorredo, Jr. in his article “Four Days that changed History” published in Bulletin Today exactly 25 years ago, as cited by Douglas J. Elwood in his book, Philippine Revolution.

The hand of God was there…” was the explanation of the late Dr. Quintin Doromal, former PCCG commissioner & president of Siliman University. Quoted by his friend Douglas Elwood in the book, Doromal, an Ilonggo leader, was a witness to the event, having joined his old friend Fidel Ramos at Camp Crame and stayed there with him throughout those critical anxious hours. Indeed, God acts through people, as surely as he speaks through people, and that he uses the sometimes complex interconnection of human forces to serve his larger purposes.

The wonder of you: Revised edition

No, this is not a revised edition of the song which became a top hit in 1950s. This is a revised edition of my blog posted during the birthday of my beloved wife last month.  But I really love the song as it is reflective of our  love experiences.

dzpatriarcaWritten by Baker Knight, The Wonder of you  was released as a single by American pop music singer Ray Peterson in 1959 and recorded by English singer Ronnie Hilton in the United Kingdom in the same year. Both versions became a top hits with Peterson peaking at #25 on Top 40 in US and Hilton’s version reaching #22 on the UK Singles Chart. Soon others followed their suit including the world legendary Elvis Presley which further popularized the song after its release as his single in 1970.

From the website of londonwelshmvc.org, I learned an interesting story behind the song. It was actually a spiritual search. The composer was ill at the time of writing and was searching for the Deity that would always be kind and forgiving toward him no matter what the conditions. While he couldn’t say it was written directly to God, he admitted searching for Him at that time. However, he didn’t finish the song until several weeks later. The delay made him realize that the song might also make a good love song. Since there was no Contemporary Christian music in those days, he decided to make it a love song.

I  have been inspired  to make a blog on this song. My way of expressing my gratitude to the woman whose love has created  wonders  which changed my life.

edsa shiftShe came into my life when I tried to return to the mainstream of normalcy after the EDSA Revolution in 1986. Resuming my remaining year in the seminary was not possible for technical reasons. Thus, I shifted to Social Work. No longer young as my classmates, a class period was an agony, having been conditioned to a non academic life. Making the adjustment worse was the label attached to my name because of controversial past. It included my participation in a movement of church people who participated in the struggle against dictatorship. It was sort of taboo in our denomination at that time.

Isolated from my faith community, coupled with difficulty in adjustment with studies and relationship, I was about to quit and go back to where I belong. But the thought of her made me hold on. Like me, she shifted to Social Work while in senior year in another course. It was a” love at first sight“, for me, the first time we met. A terror on her part, though, having a knowledge of my background. Thus, while I tried to get close to her, the more she distanced herself. Still, she served as a challenge to me against odds.

rainbow

However, all my attempts to woo her almost came to naught, including my prayers. In desperation, I think I revealed to her my plan to stage a protest action against God. (Indeed, I was really very serious with that plan.) I didn’t know if it had a bearing in my eventual success to get her precious yes. I called her the rainbow of my life. Thereafter, the wonders in our relationship, as portrayed by the song. Hence, the lyrics of  The wonder of you with intervals of the poem I made for her more than two decades ago, are addressed to my wife, as they explicitly capture the essence of our love experiences.

When no-one else can understand me
       When everything I do is wrong
              You give me hope and consolation
                       You give me strength to carry on

Like a rainbow. . . .
you come, after the storm
you accept me just as I am
you let the sun shine through
……I am no longer the same.

And you’re always there to lend a hand
        In everything I do
             That’s the wonder
                      The wonder of you

Like a rainbow. . . .
I wish the luster would stay forever
inevitably, at times it disappears
But I don’t have fear
I know its presence is still there
to appear again after another storm
……….thereafter.

And when you smile the world is brighter
        You touch my hand and I’m a king
                Your kiss to me is worth a fortune
                       Your love for me is everything

Like a rainbow. . .
our relationship looks like a compromise
between the storm and sunlight
my life’s clouded with rainstorm
yours is brilliant as daylight.

I’ll guess I’ll never know the reason why
         You love me like you do
               That’s the wonder
                       The wonder of you

Like a rainbow. . . .
Our love will glow
to prove the paradox of life,
how contradictory forces harmonize
to show the beauty in life,
when unlike poles unite.

DZai

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY, PROF. DZ QUERUBIN PATRIARCA-LARIZA.

2012 in review: An inspiring development

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 7,700 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 13 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Reliving the spirit of EDSA

This article should have been posted few days after the 26th EDSA Anniversary, had it not been affected by my hectic schedule. Although quite late, as intended, still it has timeless relevance.

Last month’s celebration of EDSA Revolution seemed to lack the cohesive element which typically characterized the people power legacy. Rather it was highlighted with exchanges of innuendos from unofficial representatives of major players in anti dictatorship struggle, reflecting a divided nation. We find on one side the President, a son of two symbols of EDSA, in his relentless drive to get rid of perceived blocks in his matuwid na daan platform specifying one in the judiciary. Rallying his call were some militant groups leaders indicating “a new type of people power” against impeached Chief Justice.

On the other hand, outspoken archbishop emeritus Oscar Cruz warned that President Aquino could himself be the subject of a “people power” revolt. Stressing the role of the Church in previous People Power movements, Cruz, in a phone interview reported in the Inquirer.net, warned the president of his downfall “if he continued to offend churches and religious faiths.”

Meanwhile, another militant group made snide remarks on President Aquino’s Edsa anniversary speech as nothing but a rehash of his previous “daang matuwid” (straight path) rhetoric. Pointing out lapses on the government in addressing the pre EDSA Revolution issues, the group was not optimistic with the present leadership. Still they joined the commemoration of EDSA Anniversary as it represents the unfulfilled Filipino people’s dreams and aspirations.

Indeed, for years, the question persists whether the spirit of EDSA is still alive after the unprecedented phenomenon more than two and a half decades ago. More so, with the present skirmishes and political bickering in various branches of our government.

I believe the spirit of EDSA is alive. But it is overshadowed by bigotry and exclusivism that try to domesticate the encompassing spirit of truth, struggle for change and advocacy for development. The over arching and encompassing spirit of EDSA mystery cannot and will never be domesticated. No person nor group can domesticate the EDSA Revolution. Even the so called EDSA heroes cannot claim exclusive right to the historical and mystical event in the Philippines. For the spirit of EDSA is inclusive. It is above all and encircles all.

I love to relate the beauty of EDSA Revolution with the systems theory which was used as framework in my thesis on Networking as a Development Strategy. The key concepts of the systems theory are wholeness, relationship, and homeostasis. Wholeness implies that the product of interaction by the elements within the system is greater than the additive sums of the separate parts. The concept of relationship asserts the importance of the pattern and structure of elements in the system, equally important as the elements themselves. Homeostasis suggests that most living systems seek a balance to maintain and preserve the system.

The systems theory focuses on communication patterns and the transactions and relationships among parts. As pointed out by Hartman (1970), the relationship among parts and the whole are of prime interest when considering the structure of a social system. This relationship is relatively stable. Sometimes, the relationship between systems is referred to as network.

The beauty of systems theory is represented by the rainbow. While there are only three primary colors (red, yellow, blue) there is a multiplication of colors when these link, interact, and overlap. Try to separate one from the other, and the beauty of rainbow is gone.

So with EDSA. It is a culmination of respective struggles participated in by the basic masses who since time immemorial always take the lead as they are ones affected. Then comes various sectors of diverse orientation, status, political and ideological leanings, colors and shapes. Youth, professionals, church people, businessmen and women, government officials, military and others. All have contributed their share in shaping the Philippine history. Try to isolate one, and the beauty of the event is gone.

Movement for change and development in any field of endeavor is often hampered by bigotry and exclusivism. Essential issues are sidetracked or left behind to give way to the struggle for supremacy misled by an illusion that one has the sole reservoir of truth and best approach in any given situation. It is only when one realizes the need to link with each other that the beauty of unity in diversity is seen like that of the rainbow.

EDSA Revolution: An Unspoiled Mystery

The mystery of EDSA Revolution remains unspoiled, not completely unfolded.

More than two decades have passed, the mystery of EDSA has not been fully unfolded. Analysts from various socio-political persuasions attempted to explain the event. Some had to come up with new concepts as EDSA Revolution departed from any of the standard categories.

While new testimonies from living participants came out every year, they just shed light to understand the pattern of events and contributing factors. But the mystery still remains. EDSA bloodless Revolution defied logic.

For how can one explains this phenomenon: “When guns and tanks of a dictator melted before the flowers held out by priests and nuns, by millionaires’ sons and squatters’ daughters, by ordinary men and women and by young and old alike; when… a new day was ushered in by ordinary Filipino common tao who rose to heroic heights that won the admiration of the whole world…” The quoted description was that of Jorge Lorredo, Jr. in his article Four Days that changed History published in Bulletin Today, as cited by Douglas J. Elwood in his book, Philippine Revolution 1986.

The hand of God was there…” was the explanation of the late Dr. Quintin Doromal, former PCCG commissioner & president of Siliman University. Quoted by his friend Douglas Elwood in the aforementioned book, Doromal was a witness to the event, having joined his old friend Fidel V. Ramos at Camp Crame and stayed there with him throughout those critical anxious hours. A noted Ilonggo leader, Dr. Doromal is a son of a Distinguished Centralian, Atty. Rosario Salas-Doromal.

Indeed, God acts through people, as surely as he speaks through people, and that he uses the sometimes complex interconnection of human forces to serve his larger purposes….”